McDonald’s Chicken Treatment
August 27th, 2015

Petition here.

A new MFA undercover investigation at a McDonald’s Chicken McNugget supplier—Tyson Foods— exposes horrific animal abuse, including:

– Birds painfully beaten, stabbed, and impaled on makeshift clubs spiked with nails and then thrown into buckets to slowly die

– Factory farm owners stepping on the heads of live chickens and then pulling their wings or bodies to break their necks

– Chickens bred to grow so fast they became crippled under their own weight and frequently died from organ failure

– Hundreds of thousands of birds crammed into filthy, windowless sheds forced to live for weeks in their own waste

 

WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH THE FDA?
August 27th, 2015

“To dispose of sick birds that may spread bird flu, the USDA has proposed shutting off the ventilation systems of buildings where the birds live. That would cause temperatures in the buildings to spike, essentially baking poultry alive.

The agency admits the potential for “prolonged suffering,” with most birds not dying for an hour and a half and some surviving past three hours.”

Petition Here.

Waves
August 26th, 2015

Alien
August 26th, 2015

land-like-a-cat: good job mom. now this is a cat pile
August 25th, 2015

land-like-a-cat:

good job mom. now this is a cat pile

http://ift.tt/1If24GE

todropscience: todropscience: North american researchers at UC…
August 25th, 2015

todropscience:

todropscience:

North american researchers at UC Berkeley and California Academy of Sciences have found that the larger Pacific-striped octopus has a unique hunting strategy: Rather than pounce on its prey, it stalks and gently taps it to startle it. Often this drives it into the octopus’s waiting arms…. 

The larger Pacific striped octopus , is, despite its name, no bigger than a tangerine.  Also uses a “slow bounce” to hunt. With its body flattened, and dorsal arms reaching forward, the octopus glides with sporadic bursts of hopping movements before it snatches up its prey of choice.

The octopus is rare, in fact, science has yet no even give it a formal scientific name (belong to Octopus genus). Is poorly understood, however, a recent study shown, they are somewhat social, they mate face-to-face, and the females produce multiple batches of offspring.

“excus my, buht can I? excus my–ÑAM!!! GOTCHA

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Photo
August 25th, 2015

http://ift.tt/1EjdiPN

Photo
August 25th, 2015

http://ift.tt/1PS0bpE